The Department of Divination and Diviner Control

It was a dark matter.

That the subject painted it in rainbow hues didn’t change the tone, which was surprising in itself. Bright green paint entwined with crimson (the world serpent, the blood of its victims), vast swirls of cerulean blue (for the sky, the day before it burned).

“So…what, exactly, is this?”

His partner gave him an blank stare, before turning her gaze back to the walls, covered in thick paint and thin finger-marks.

“Ok…dumb question. But where is it?”

That was another dumb question. But it was an excusable one.

They were an odd pair, but that was a given. The Department of Divination and Diviner Control tended to attract the peculiar. He was short, and some might describe him as ‘swarthy’. She was tall, ‘willowy’. Her powerful, him diminutive. They didn’t attract as much attention as you’d expect.

The little boy had been in their care for some time – it took a while before little ones made helpful predictions; it could take a while before they were even noticed to be prophets. After all, to a toddler, the fact that the sun was going to rise tomorrow is pretty big news.

The sun would come up tomorrow.

But the Department would have to work hard to ensure it came up the day after that.

 


 

Written for this week’s BeKindRewrite prompts: Fingerpaint Prophecy, Dark Matter, Blank Stare and Odd Pair. Let me know what you think! 

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6 thoughts on “The Department of Divination and Diviner Control

  1. Bryan Ens says:

    interesting idea that a child finds the “ordinary” to be amazing, and therefore if a toddler predicts tomorrow’s sunrise, he shows potential as a predictor of the future.

  2. Bryan Ens says:

    by the way…the first sentence of your 3rd last paragraph: you used the word “sometime”. I think that you might want that to be “some time”

  3. So cool. I love this idea. Out of the mouths of babes. The setup, almost like a family unit, the descriptions of the partners…it all instantly has fascination and history.

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